Energy saving when Air Conditioning Is A Must

energy saving by air conditioner

 

There are ways to keep cool without turning on your air conditioner, but when the summer temperatures start busting the 90 (or 100!) degree mark daily, or the humidity makes it feel like you’re swimming through a bowl of soup, sometimes air conditioning is a must.

How does an air conditioner work?

For most people, air conditioner just throws cool air at the temperature one sets it at. But does it really work that way? In fact air conditioner during cooling process, takes the indoor air, cools it  by passing it through evaporator coil and throws it back in the room. It is quite opposite to how our good old air coolers used to work. Air coolers used to take outside air, cool it with water and throw it in. But air conditioners just work on internal air.

Regular Maintenance An air conditioner’s filters, coils, and fins require regular maintenance for the unit to function effectively and efficiently throughout its years of service. Neglecting necessary maintenance ensures a steady decline in air conditioning performance while energy use steadily increases. Air Conditioner Filters The most important maintenance task that will ensure the efficiency of your air conditioner is to routinely replace or clean its filters. Clogged, dirty filters block normal air flow and reduce a system’s efficiency significantly. With normal air flow obstructed, air that bypasses the filter may carry dirt directly into the evaporator coil and impair the coil’s heat-absorbing capacity. Filters are located somewhere along the return duct’s length. Common filter locations are in walls, ceilings, furnaces, or in the air conditioner itself. Some types of filters are reusable; others must be replaced. They are available in a variety of types and efficiencies. Clean or replace your air conditioning system’s filter or filters every month or two during the cooling season. Filters may need more frequent attention if the air conditioner is in constant use, is subjected to dusty conditions, or you have fur-bearing pets in the house.

 

Stay cool and save money with these energy saving tips:

  1. Keep the AC Lower at Night:During the night you don’t require the same level of conscious cool. Try turning your AC down (so it is running less) during your sleep hours or, if your unit has one, utilize the “sleep mode” which lowers the output on a timer.
  2. Use Window or Portable Units:If you aren’t into cooling your whole home, try using a portable unit to cool just the area you’ll be working in. They use up to 50% less energy than a larger central air unit would to cool off the same space.

    3. Close Off Vents:The basement is traditionally the coolest room in the home, so try closing all the vents in the lower portion of your home. The cool air will slink down there naturally and by closing those vents, you’re forcing all the air up top first, cooling as it comes down.

    4. Service Your Unit: Some basic maintenance might be all your air conditioner needs, but most will greatly benefit from a good hosing out, especially if you’re plagued with pesky trees like Cottonwoods that drop seeds which stick to the filters and make the unit work harder!

  3. Check Your Ducts:Making sure the areas where your ducts run through parts of your home without air conditioning (like the attic) are properly insulated will keep the air coming in as cool as it can be. Paying for half cool air isn’t anyone’s idea of money well spent!
  4. Rearrange Your Furniture:Furniture that obstructs air conditioning vents means you could be cooling the back of a chair or the bottom side of your sofa and although it might appreciate the thought, we’re pretty sure you’d rather have that chill for yourself instead. There are plastic pieces you can buy for your vents to help force air in the right direction, but the easiest way is to just rearrange your furniture, even if only temporarily.

7. What is the ideal temperature that should be set on thermostat?

Having said that, increase in temperature does not reduce the comfort level. In fact as per ASHRAE (American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers), the ideal temperature for thermal comfort is between 23.5oC (74.3oF) and 25.5oC (78oF) in summers (depends on several factors as listed on wikipedia). Thus setting the temperature to 24oC (75.2oF) saves on electricity bill and provides good comfort. Using ceiling fans along with air conditioners can additionally help in increasing the thermostat temperature.

  1. Lighting:Turning lights off can help reduce your heat, but paying attention to how much light you let in from open windows can also play a significant role. Although it might seem neurotic to open and close your windows every day with the changing of the sun, it makes a huge difference in how much heat your a.c. is competing against.
  2. Is Anyone Home?:If you can, while you’re away turn your AC up to 85 and make sure the windows and drapes are closed. Although it will be hot for a few minutes when you come home, the blinds will help keep the sun out (allowing existing cool to stay that way for as long as possible) and the heat won’t be so substantial that your unit will have to work overtime to cool the room back off.
  3. Don’t Forget The Fan:We rely on air conditioners to keep things cool, but having the help of a few supplemental fans doesn’t hurt. Using them to circulate the cool air means you don’t need quite as much pumped into the room. They use less energy than your air conditioner unit, so having them around as backup is a great idea.

One thought on “Energy saving when Air Conditioning Is A Must

  1. In ur 9th point, while you are away from home turn up ac to 85
    What that actually mean, I am unable to get that

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